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Cutts Explains about the 410 and 404 Header Statuses

When Google crawl a website and encounters the status codes 404 and 410, what do they do and is there any difference? A webmaster asked Matt Cutts for clarification regarding this and Cutts, of course, replied in another Google Webmaster video. The question posted was; Before answering the question right...

Posted by: Richard Eaves

Posted in: Search Engine News

Date Added: Apr 16, 2014

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Clarifications About Google Secure Paid Search Queries

Amidst the slight panic caused by Google’s further assault on keyword referer data  from logged in secure searches, it may not be as bad as it first sounded. Some things probably need clarifying. Marketers will still be able to get important keyword data, just not from Google Analytics. Furthermore, the...

Posted by: Richard Eaves

Posted in: Search Engine News

Date Added: Apr 14, 2014

secured

Suspicions Confirmed About Paid Search Data

The prediction that Google may stop passing referrer data for paid ads has finally been confirmed. Advertisers will now start getting “not provided” in their Google Analytics with regards to keyword data, similar to what’s been happening to organic search since October 2011. Image is in the Public Domain Google...

Posted by: Richard Eaves

Posted in: Search Engine News

Date Added: Apr 11, 2014

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Major Websites Scramble to Protect Themselves against Heartbleed Bug

On Monday 7th April 2014, a new major security threat to the entire online community was revealed. The bug, popularly known as Heartbleed, is said to have been running undetected since December 2011....

Posted by: Richard Eaves

Posted in: Search Engine News

Date Added: Apr 11, 2014

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Twitter Reveals the Upcoming Launch of New Design for Profile Pages

Twitter recently announced via their blog that they will soon be launching a revamped look of their profile pages. The new and improved design is meant to make it “easier” and “more enjoyable for users to express themselves. It allows users to set up a larger profile photo, customise the...

Posted by: Jonny Lis

Posted in: Search Engine News

Date Added: Apr 9, 2014

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Google Announce Markup for Multinational Site Annotations in Sitemaps

Google Announce Markup for Multinational Site Annotations in Sitemaps

Creating and submitting a more comprehensive XML Sitemap helps to make sure that search engines like Google will know about all the pages on your site, including URLs that may not be discoverable by bots crawling process. Quite recently, Google introduced a new markup for multiregional websites that target users in many languages that can be applied specifically on XML sitemaps which could mean smaller page sizes and easier deployment in the case of some websites.

Introducing the New Sitemap Tags
To indicate to Google that you want a specific language to be served to searchers, you must do the following: (1) create a separate URL element for each page and (2) each URL element must include a location tag indicating the page URLs, and an xhtml:link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”XX” sub-element for every alternate version of the page, including itself.

Example:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”en” href=”http://www.example.com/en” >
<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”de” href=”http://www.example.com/de” >

Wherein the equivalent markup in Sitemaps:

<url>
<loc>http://www.example.com/en</loc>
<xhtml:link
rel=”alternate”
hreflang=”de”
href=”http://www.example.com/de” />
<xhtml:link
rel=”alternate”
hreflang=”en”
href=”http://www.example.com/en” />
</url>
<url>
<loc>http://www.example.com/de</loc>
<xhtml:link
rel=”alternate”
hreflang=”de”
href=”http://www.example.com/de” />
<xhtml:link
rel=”alternate”
hreflang=”en”
href=”http://www.example.com/en” />
</url>

As per Google if you have several alternate URLs targeted at users with the same language but in different locales, you can indicate the English page in one of three ways:

HTML link element. In the HTML <head> section of http://www.example.com/, add a link element pointing to the Spanish version of that webpage at http://es.example.com/, like this:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”es” href=”http://es.example.com/” />

HTTP header. If you publish non-HTML files (like PDFs), you can use an HTTP header to indicate a different language version of a URL:

Link: <http://es.example.com/>; rel=”alternate”; hreflang=”es”

Sitemap. Instead of using markup, you can submit language version information in a Sitemap.

Likewise, if you wish to use the rel=”alternate” hreflang=”x” it’s a good idea to provide a generic URL for geographically unspecified users. However, since Google believes that the new link markup will help webmasters to stay away from the duplicate content issue. It is important to note that this markup tells Google’s algorithm to consider all of these pages as alternate versions of each other rather this is used on the page level, so you need to markup each page or set of pages individually.

About The Author:

Stuart
Stuart has been involved in online marketing since 2005 and enjoys the day to day challenges. Knowledgable in all aspects of SEO he particulary is interested in Analytics, Conversions and Local and Mobile SEO. View all posts by Stuart Seo Blog
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